Tag Archives: archive

Exploring Theme Pages

The last several months have been a whirlwind for us all. While the world learns to deal with the concept of “social distancing” we hope that everyone is able to find some bright spots in their abundance of “me time.” The ‘Ulu’ulu staff is largely working from home, at the moment, but there are still parts of our collection that you can access without contacting us directly. For example, if you haven’t gotten a chance to familiarize yourself with our website, please do! The clip collection, in particular, is a feature on our website that is meant to assist anyone interested in searching our collection for research or just for fun. It’s perfect for when you have some extra time on your hands.
Anyone can search the clip collection using the search bar that should be at the top of every page on our website. The clip collection is always growing and we also create themes to pull some of them together by topic. Some topics are entertaining and some are more solemn, but we try to encompass the breadth of our collection in these themes. Past themes have included The Merrie Monarch Festival, Wai (water rights), politicians, women’s history month, paniolo and so much more. We have continued creating theme pages and are aiming to release new ones regularly as more items from our collections are digitized.
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From our home page uluulu.hawaii.edu you can follow the navigation link at the top right hand corner of the page that says “Explore,” and this will take you to the complete collection of Theme Pages. You can browse through all of them and even discover a jumping off point for learning more. The sampling of clips in our themes are not exhaustive, but we hope they are an enlightening introduction to the many facets of Hawai‘i that are preserved in our archive. Below, are the two most recent themes focusing on the Performing Arts in Hawai‘i and Food!
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Performing Arts

The performing arts have always been a big part of the cultures of Hawai‘i. From Hula to comedy, everything we do is unique or has a unique spin on it. We thought this would be a terrific opportunity to highlight ‘Ulu’ulu’s growing collection of performing arts materials.
We added a corresponding web theme to share some of the many clips that are available on our website to view. This collection focuses on the performing arts legacy that Hawai‘i and its people have nurtured for generations. Because of its multitude of cultures, Hawai‘i has regularly churned out artists and performances that are distinctly its own. Included here are a combination of clips depicting dance, stage drama, comedy and musical performances.

Food

We updated an older theme on food to include some of our more recently generated clips, as food is one of the most important facets of any group of people. We need it to survive, but we also consume and share certain foods as ways to celebrate life events, comfort ourselves and demonstrate pride in our heritage. Here is our updated, theme page with clips from our numerous collections showing some of the many aspects of food in Hawai’i, from gathering to production to enjoyment.
The clips that we post are only about 10% of the full-length footage. So, if you find yourself wanting to know just how the rest of an interview or segment went in one of the clips, there is the “Ask an Archivist” button the bottom of every page on our website. If you click on that button, you can fill out the form and let us know which clip you want to see more of. Try to give as much information as possible; the title and the title number are particularly helpful. From there, we’ll be able to assist you in getting the full-length footage streamed directly to you.
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We hope that this additional knowledge helps boost understanding about the archive and what we do.
Stay safe and healthy, everyone!

A Special Message from the Archive

Aloha everyone,

As we all face the unique challenges that the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) has brought to us in recent months ‘Ulu’ulu is doing what we can to adjust so that we can to maintain service and ensure the well-being of our staff, researchers and colleagues. We are monitoring the situation as it swiftly evolves. Please be aware, that as a result, services and response times may be delayed.

To reduce the risk of exposure and transmission, ‘Ulu’ulu has also canceled any existing reservations and visits for the rest of the academic semester, and will not be making any new reservations for the time being.

Mahalo nui for your patience and understanding in this difficult time. Please stay safe, healthy and take care of each other!

Sincerely,

The ‘Ulu’ulu Staff

Paid 2020 Summer Roselani Media Preservation Internship

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Applications are now being accepted for the 2020 Roselani Media Preservation Internship at ‘Ulu‘ulu Moving Image Archive!

We are pleased to announce an exciting new partnership with the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA). This year, ‘Ulu‘ulu is a host site for AMIA’s Diversity and Inclusion Fellowship Program. AMIA Fellows may complete their internship at ‘Ulu‘ulu if accepted into both programs.

The student selected as the 2020 Roselani Intern must be committed to the preservation of our media history and enrolled in a moving image or archival academic program. Working side-by-side with experienced archivists, the intern will gain practical experience in a moving image archive.

The intern will receive a $4,000 stipend.

Application and information may be downloaded here.

Key dates:
February 1 – March 15: Applications accepted
April 15: Selection made
May – September: Internship takes place over 6-8 consecutive weeks (200 hours)

Interested in what a Roselani Media Preservation Internship is like? Meet some of our former interns:
2019 Roselani Intern
2018 Roselani Intern
2017 Roselani Intern
2016 Roselani Intern
2015 Roselani Intern

Introducing our 2019 Roselani Intern

Our 2019 Summer Roselani Intern is Shannon Devlin. Shannon has been working in audiovisual archives for the past two and-a-half years and recently graduated with her Masters of Library Science from Indiana University. Originally from Louisville, Kentucky, Shannon enjoys karaoke, watching movies and reading. She also really loves and misses her cat.

Prior to her time with ‘Ulu’ulu, Shannon had never set foot in Hawai’i! Shannon’s six weeks with us have flown by and are almost over, but we didn’t want to let her go without asking some questions about herself and her time with us, and having the opportunity to share.

What brought you here to ‘Ulu‘ulu? What are some of the things you’re hoping to learn during your internship with us?

I found ‘Ulu’ulu through my boss and professor Andy Uhrich, at the Indiana University Moving Image Archive, as well as a posting on the Association of Moving Image Archivists website. Andy promoted the position in his Intro to Moving Image Archive class, when it came available. I had wanted to apply to the position when it first came available that year, but felt that it may not work for me at the time, but when it came available this past semester, I really wanted to try my luck!

I have learned so much from working at the ‘Ulu’ulu Moving Image Archive, both in working with the newest incoming collections, as well as the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, the Pacific Islanders in Communications collection, and the Juniroa Productions Collection. For me, it has been particularly eye-opening to see the differences that size and budget make in an archive. I think that ‘Ulu’ulu is a great place that is doing so much good work for the Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Island collections that they hold.

What projects are you working on at ‘Ulu‘ulu?

A new incoming collection, which was the film and video collection of a local Hawaii filmmaker. (There’s more exciting news to come concerning this collection!) I have been helping to inventory and inspect the many film and video formats within it. I am also working on the PIFSC collection, for which I have been performing quality control and writing up descriptions of the digitized films for the archives Mavis database, and selecting clips for the ‘Ulu’ulu website. I am also working on cleaning, prepping, and performing quality control on the Juniroa Production materials, and the Pacific Islanders in Communications collection, for which I cleaned up metadata, and have been rehousing and finding new homes for the materials that were previously in boxes in the vault.

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Shannon inspecting videos from an incoming collection.

Is there anything about the videos you are working with that is surprising or unexpected?

I really enjoyed learning about the people living on the island of Lana’i, who were highlighted in part of the Juniroa collection which I QC’d. There was also a whole video I described that had a mama and a baby seal cuddling a beach!

Now that you have worked as a Moving Image Archivist and with Hawaiian cultural materials, what is your favorite aspect of the job and why?

I love inspecting film! It’s still my favorite part of being a Moving Image Archivist. There is something exciting about seeing beautiful images on film, and learning about/seeing interesting film damage.

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Shannon and Processing Archivist, Hoku, inspecting film.

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Receiving a massive collection.

So you’ve been here for a few weeks now, what are you enjoying most about Hawai‘i?

It’s beautiful! I love that I am both near the mountains and the ocean. This is the furthest I’ve ever been from home, and it has been so interesting to both learn about the Hawaiian culture and Hawaiian language, as well as just see the natural beauty that is Hawai’i. Also, everyone I’ve met has been so nice!

Do you have any advice for future Roselani Media Preservation Interns?

Maybe plan out things that you’d like to do in Hawai’i before you get here, as I’m still kind of figuring out what I want to do before I go. I would also recommend having an open mind, being prepared to work with multiple different kinds of materials. Also, be prepared for some weird film decay, if you end up working with film here!

As always, we want to give thanks to the generous support of the Henry Ku‘ualoha & Muriel Roselani Giugni Fund of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation, the Roselani Media Preservation Internship is offered each year at ‘Ulu‘ulu to give a student of merit who is committed to the preservation of our media history the opportunity to acquire practical experience in a moving image archive. 

Aloha!

This blog has been set up to document and disseminate information about the first
phase of the Henry K. Giugni Archives Project. I have been brought on as a
consultant to develop and write a report to act as a blueprint and guide for the
creation of the Archive. 

My report will include a survey of moving image materials throughout the State of
Hawai`i, recommendations on physical requirements for a new space, cataloging
practices, handling and preservation, best practices for digitization and metadata,
personnel needs, equipment and technical needs, and the dissemination of
materials to the public online.

A summary of the report will be published here at the end of September, 2009.

Please feel free to comment on my postings and leave your opinions about the
work being done on this important project.

For more information about me and what I do please visit the
Film & Media Archive  that I manage at Washington University in St. Louis.

Mahalo,

David Rowntree
Consultant for the HKG Archive