Category Archives: Internships

Introducing our 2018 Roselani Intern

This summer we were very happy to welcome Miyuki Meyer as our awesome Roselani Media Preservation Intern! Miyuki is currently halfway through the MLIS program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she works as the Media Preservation Graduate Assistant at the Preservation Services of the University Library. She has a background in photography and video, and received her MFA in Visual Arts from SUNY at Purchase College. Miyuki grew up between Tokyo/Kagoshima, and Sharjah, U.A.E, and has been living in the U.S. for almost 10 years. We asked Miyuki a few questions to learn a bit more about her.

What brought you here to ‘Ulu‘ulu? What are some of the things you’re hoping to learn during your internship with us?
As Hawai‘i’s state regional moving image archive, ‘Ulu‘ulu’s growing audiovisual collection retains collective voices and memories of local communities’ past. I am most inspired by the archives’ mission to safeguard this history, and provide long-term preservation and access of the analog and digital collection through collaborative efforts. Amongst the many things I would like to learn, some of them include collection management, digital asset management, cataloguing native Hawaiian content, and maintaining and operating a video digitization lab.

What projects are you working on at ‘Ulu‘ulu?
I am working on two projects: processing Juniroa Productions materials, and digitizing raw footage of “Holo Mai Pele,” a traditional hula performance that tells the legendary tale of the two Hawaiian goddesses, Pele and Hi‘iaka. The raw footage was recorded on over 90 analog videotapes, and produced by Pacific Islanders in Communications. In my processing work, I’ve rehoused and reshelved a wide range of audiovisual formats in ‘Ulu‘ulu’s cold storage vault, and updated cataloguing records of the rehoused items using MAVIS. I have digitized almost 40 videotapes so far, and I’ve been learning about the overall video digitization and quality control workflow for best digital preservation practices. Outside of these projects, I also assist with environmental monitoring, and exhibit set up.

Is there anything about the videos you are working with that is surprising or unexpected?
As a new student of Hawaiian culture and history, I’ve enjoyed learning about hula ‘aiha‘a, which is a form of traditional hula dance that stems from the Pele clan, and pays tribute to the island and to Pele and Hiʻiaka (see Holo Mai Pele Educator’s Guide). It is humbling to see the performers rehearse and repeat countless segments of the same performance over and over again, and the powerful, beautiful poetic songs that accompany the dance movements that echo the forces of nature on the island has been an incredible experience. I was awed by the performers’ resilience, and the connection the dance has to their ʻāina. As I’ve navigated throughout O‘ahu on my days off, especially trekking the grounds of the hiking trails, my appreciation for Holo Mai Pele, as well as learning about the Hawaiian culture, has grown with each videotape. As an immigrant who has spent much of my life abroad, the connection people have to their home is personally significant. I was not expecting how much I would be drawn to the content of the videotapes, and how much this project would have a positive effect on me.

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Now that you have worked as a Moving Image Archivist and with Hawaiian cultural materials, what is your favorite aspect of the job and why?
With my interests in ideas of home and culture, I appreciate how working with Hawaiian cultural materials as a Moving Image Archivist means that I get to be part of the initiative to preserve local culture. My favorite aspect of the job is the real time capture process to video digitization, and researching the content of the production. This has allowed me to engage with the collection as a viewer to acquire an understanding of what is involved in the production tapes, as well as be an active participant. A lot of the videotapes I’ve worked on have been insightful, including the Ah Quon McElrath oral history tapes I’ve had a pleasure of watching.

So you’ve been here for a few weeks now, what are you enjoying most about Hawai‘i?
I’ve been spending on average 3-4 hours on TheBus everyday, which definitely sounds dreadful, but I’ve enjoyed exploring different neighborhoods on the island by foot. This has exposed me to how multicultural and diverse Hawai‘i is, and as someone who has been raised in a multicultural family, I felt at ease and at home. One of my favorite destinations is the Hawai‘i State Art Museum, where it exhibits a fantastic collection of artwork that reflects and forms observations on the history of the island. I got to see the Disney movie, Moana, in the native Hawaiian language on the outdoor fields of the Bishop Museum, and the Dead of Night, a powerful play by Edward Sakamoto at Kumu Kahua Theatre. Both were amazing experiences where I got to celebrate local culture with my coworkers at ‘Ulu‘ulu. The coffee at Morning Glass Coffee has been exceptional, where you are surrounded by a gorgeous mountain view of the Mānoa neighborhood. There is a short hike up north, where the trail leads up through the Lyon Arboretum and the Mānoa falls, where one is immersed in the lush greens of the mountain.

We hear that you are a foodie, what local delicacies have you discovered?
I took an hour bus ride to visit the Liliha Bakery to try their coco puff and poi donut, which was totally worth it. One morning Robbie, the Digital Media Specialist at ‘Ulu‘ulu, brought in a vintage pink box with blue lettering that read “Leonard’s Bakery,” which contained hot malasadas, a local Portuguese delicacy. Plain, haupia, chocolate filled malasadas. I am definitely going to miss these!

Do you have any advice for future Roselani Media Preservation Interns?
Beyond the duties of your internship, the overall experience depends upon what you make of it. My personal experience of working with Hawaiian cultural materials has been increasingly enriching as I’ve taken the time to explore the island, and learn about local culture and history. Visiting local museums, public libraries, historical sites, and trekking the grounds of the island are important parts of this internship. These explorations have heightened my awareness of working with cultural materials. In a way, it makes you realize how preserving native voices, its history and culture, are valuable initiatives to be part of.

Thanks to the generous support of the Henry Ku‘ualoha & Muriel Roselani Giugni Fund of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation, the Roselani Media Preservation Internship is offered each year at ‘Ulu‘ulu to give a student of merit who is committed to the preservation of our media history the opportunity to acquire practical experience in a moving image archive. 

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Paid 2018 Summer Roselani Media Preservation Internship

Applications are now being accepted for the 2018 Roselani Media Preservation Internship at ‘Ulu‘ulu Moving Image Archive!

The student selected as the 2018 Roselani Intern must be committed to the preservation of our media history and enrolled in a moving image or archival academic program. Working side-by-side with experienced archivists, the intern will gain practical experience in a moving image archive.

The intern will receive a $3,000 stipend.

Application Form and Instructions may be downloaded here.

Key dates:
February 1 – April 1: Applications accepted
April 15: Selection made
May – September: Internship takes place over 6-8 consecutive weeks (200 hours)

Interested in what a Roselani Media Preservation Internship is like? Meet some of our former interns:
2017 Roselani Intern – https://hkgarchives.org/2017/09/06/introducing-our-2017-roselani-intern/
2016 Roselani Intern – https://hkgarchives.org/2016/08/15/introducing-our-2016-roselani-intern/
2015 Roselani Intern – https://hkgarchives.org/2015/09/08/roselani-intern/

‘Ulu’ulu Yearbook

Throughout the years, ‘Ulu’ulu has had many different volunteers, interns and project assistants who have helped facilitate our mission. We are grateful for their contributions! We thought it would be fun to create an ‘Ulu’ulu yearbook that features all the faces who’ve been part of our ‘ohana.

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I’m very proud to have worked on creating access to materials from The Hawaiian Legacy Foundation.  I believe that it has become a part of my own collection of uncanny little moments that will help guide me in my life’s work.

~ Hoku Ka’aha’āina, class of 2017

I feel what I gained from this amazing opportunity was a better skill set to tackle audiovisual material challenges, awareness that establishing relationships with community members can go a long way to being trusted to maintain Native Hawaiian cultural materials, and most importantly friendship that provides the sharing of  knowledge and support of one another.

~ April Rodriguez, Class of 2015

My experience at ʻUluʻulu was absolutely wonderful. The staff are so welcoming, knowledgeable, and competent, and the collection is unique and priceless. I feel so fortunate that I was able to spend the last several months at ‘Ulu’ulu, and I hope to continue my learning of Hawai’i’s moving image history.

~ Keahiahi Long, Class of 2014

Check out blog posts which feature various interns, volunteers, and project assistants to find out more about their experiences and projects they took part in during their time with ‘Ulu’ulu!

Hoku Ka’aha’āina 2017 – present Project Assistant

Marc Matsumoto 2017 ACM Intern

Keala Richard 2016-2017 Project Assistant

Sarah Smith 2016 Roselani Intern

Sage Kaonohi 2016 Intern

Letitia Lavoie 2016 Intern

April Rodriguez 2015 Roselani Intern

Hugh Fleming 2015 ACM Intern

Keahiahi Long 2014 LIS Intern

Peter Kowen 2013 Volunteer/ 2014 Project Assistant

Ashley Hartwell 2013 Volunteer

Koa Luke 2012 Volunteer/ 2013 Project Assistant

Mahalo nui!!

Paid 2017 Summer Roselani Media Preservation Internship

uluuluinternshipspring2017

Applications are now being accepted for the 2017 Roselani Media Preservation Internship at ‘Ulu‘ulu Moving Image Archive!

The student selected as the 2017 Roselani Intern must be committed to the preservation of our media history and enrolled in a moving image or archival academic program. Working side-by-side with experienced archivists, the intern will gain practical experience in a moving image archive.

The intern will receive a $3,000 stipend.

Application Form and Instructions may be downloaded here.

Key dates:

January 15 – March 15: Applications accepted

April 1: Selection made

May – September: Internship takes place over 6-8 consecutive weeks (200 hours)

Interested in what a Roselani Media Preservation Internship is like? Meet some of our former interns:

2016 Roselani Intern – https://hkgarchives.org/2016/08/15/introducing-our-2016-roselani-intern/

2015 Roselani Intern – https://hkgarchives.org/2015/09/08/roselani-intern/

Announcing the 2015 Roselani Media Preservation Internship at ‘Ulu‘ulu

‘Ulu‘ulu is pleased to announce a new internship opportunity for Summer 2015! Applications are now being accepted for the Roselani Media Preservation Internship. The student selected as the 2015 Roselani Intern must be committed to the preservation of our media history and enrolled in a moving image or archival academic program.

The intern will receive a $3,000 stipend and the opportunity to acquire practical experience in a moving image archive during this 6-8 week internship.

Application deadline is March 15, 2015

Application Form and Instructions may be downloaded here.

Welcome Hugh Fleming – Spring ACM Intern

Hugh Fleming, Spring 2015 Intern

Hugh Fleming, Spring 2015 Intern

There’s a new intern at `Ulu`ulu this semester, Hugh Fleming! Hugh is a sixteen year resident of O`ahu. After retiring from the U.S. Navy in 2007 and working various contract positions in the “IT Field”, Hugh decided to set his sights on pursuing his life long dream working in the TV and Film Industry. At the age of 45, Hugh entered college for the first time. In 2013, Hugh successfully obtained is Associates of Science Degree from Leeward Community College in their Television Production (TVPRO) Program. Hugh has worked and volunteered for a variety of local TV and Film organizations, including “Da Crew” FRE LLC, 1013 Productions, and `Olelo. He is currently pursuing his B.A in Creative Media program at the University of Hawai`i at West O`ahu and hopes to work in film industry.

Hugh is enjoying his time at `Ulu`ulu because he enjoys learning more about the history of Hawai`i and it’s people. His time spent here at `Ulu`ulu will allow Hugh to gain this knowledge and also gain archival experience in a moving image archive. When he’s not here at `Ulu`ulu, Hugh teaches ZUMBA, and is a Freelance Photographer, taking pictures of local Events, Weddings, and portraits.

 

 

 

Reflections from an ʻUluʻulu Intern

Keahiahi Long, Library & Information Science Intern, Fall 2014

Keahiahi Long, Library & Information Science Intern, Fall 2014

Over this past fall semester, we welcomed Keahiahi Long as an intern here at ʻUluʻulu. Keahiahi’s internship structure was designed in a way that would build on her knowledge of archival practices and introduce her to the various roles of archive staff. She shares some reflections from her final internship report below.

But first, a friendly reminder that INTERNSHIPS ARE AVAILABLE FOR SPRING 2015! 😉

Keahiahi writes… For the Fall 2014 semester, as part of the Internship class at the Library and Information Science Program at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, I completed 150 hours of work at ʻUluʻulu.  There were four objectives that I set out to accomplish during my time at ʻUluʻulu:

  1. Further my experience with digitization workflows and tools
  2. Further my experience with content/digital asset management systems
  3. Understand better the roles of all staff members working at a small archive
  4. Expand my knowledge of Hawaiʻi’s archival materials

To meet Objective #1, I worked with Robbie Omura, the Digitization Technician at ʻUluʻulu.  I spent approximately 30 hours with Robbie throughout the semester, and in that time, Robbie had me help him with a variety of tasks related to ʻUluʻulu’s digital content.  I was even able to clean, prep, and digitize a tape using the SAMMA migration system.

To meet Objective #2, I worked with Koa Luke, the Assistant Archivist / Cataloger.  ʻUluʻulu is using MAVIS (Merged Audio Visual Information System) to catalog all of the archive’s materials and processes.  MAVIS is a proprietary software developed in Australia that allows its users to catalog a multitude of descriptive, structural, and administrative metadata.  The software also allows users to take that data and export / map it into various metadata schema, such as PBCore and METS.  In working with Koa, I was able to create MAVIS records for a few tapes from the ʻUluʻulu collection.

To meet Objective #3, I observed and participated in a variety of functions at ʻUluʻulu.  In addition to Cultural Collections Specialist / Producer Heather Guigni, the archive has four dedicated, full-time staff members, and each of them have clearly defined roles.  My internship was structured so that I spent time with each of those four staff members: Janel Quirante (Head Archivist), Shavonn Matsuda (Assistant Archivist / Reference & Outreach), Robbie, and Koa.  This structure allowed me to participate in the duties and responsibilities of each staff member, while also allowing me to see how each staff member and his or her work contributed to the overall success of the archive.

ʻUluʻulu is the official moving image archive of the State of Hawaiʻi, so to meet Objective #4, I worked with the archive’s materials in a number of different ways.  First, searching through the archive’s content management system allowed me to discover materials, as well as understand their intellectual order.  Second, inspecting and processing incoming materials to the archive allowed me hands-on interaction with the materials, and I was able to learn their formats and conditions.  Third, completing preliminary inventories of collections also allowed me hands-on interaction with the materials, and from that process I was able to learn the titles of the materials and the descriptions of their contents.

There were several valuable aspects to my internship at ʻUluʻulu, and the one that was most impactful for me was learning how to handle and care for audiovisual materials.  At ʻUluʻulu, I was exposed to a wide range of film and tape formats, and I learned so much about their physical make-up.  In regards to their physical condition, one of the things I saw a lot of was deterioration.  Two of my major tasks for this internship were completing the initial inspections of both the Bob Johnson and Naomi Sodetani Collections.  One of the purposes of the initial inspection is to determine whether or not the materials are safe to enter the processing and storage sections of the archive.  If it is deemed that the materials are unsafe, then they are kept in the quarantine room.  Unsafe materials include those that have mold on them.  Here in Hawaiʻi, mold on videotapes and films is common because of our warm temperatures and high humidity.  Mold is detrimental to film and videotapes because mold can eat into the film or tape, causing damage to the object and loss of information/data.  So, here is my public service announcement: if you have personal collections of films or videotapes, DO NOT KEEP THEM IN A BOX IN THE GARAGE!  You need to store them in an area that is cool, dry, and with little fluctuation in temperature or humidity.

In summary, my experience at ʻUluʻulu was absolutely wonderful.  The staff are so welcoming, knowledgeable, and competent, and the collection is unique and priceless.  I feel so fortunate that I was able to spend the last several months at ʻUluʻulu, and I hope to continue my learning of Hawaiʻi’s moving image history.