Introducing our 2019 Roselani Intern

Our 2019 Summer Roselani Intern is Shannon Devlin. Shannon has been working in audiovisual archives for the past two and-a-half years and recently graduated with her Masters of Library Science from Indiana University. Originally from Louisville, Kentucky, Shannon enjoys karaoke, watching movies and reading. She also really loves and misses her cat.

Prior to her time with ‘Ulu’ulu, Shannon had never set foot in Hawai’i! Shannon’s six weeks with us have flown by and are almost over, but we didn’t want to let her go without asking some questions about herself and her time with us, and having the opportunity to share.

What brought you here to ‘Ulu‘ulu? What are some of the things you’re hoping to learn during your internship with us?

I found ‘Ulu’ulu through my boss and professor Andy Uhrich, at the Indiana University Moving Image Archive, as well as a posting on the Association of Moving Image Archivists website. Andy promoted the position in his Intro to Moving Image Archive class, when it came available. I had wanted to apply to the position when it first came available that year, but felt that it may not work for me at the time, but when it came available this past semester, I really wanted to try my luck!

I have learned so much from working at the ‘Ulu’ulu Moving Image Archive, both in working with the newest incoming collections, as well as the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, the Pacific Islanders in Communications collection, and the Juniroa Productions Collection. For me, it has been particularly eye-opening to see the differences that size and budget make in an archive. I think that ‘Ulu’ulu is a great place that is doing so much good work for the Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Island collections that they hold.

What projects are you working on at ‘Ulu‘ulu?

A new incoming collection, which was the film and video collection of a local Hawaii filmmaker. (There’s more exciting news to come concerning this collection!) I have been helping to inventory and inspect the many film and video formats within it. I am also working on the PIFSC collection, for which I have been performing quality control and writing up descriptions of the digitized films for the archives Mavis database, and selecting clips for the ‘Ulu’ulu website. I am also working on cleaning, prepping, and performing quality control on the Juniroa Production materials, and the Pacific Islanders in Communications collection, for which I cleaned up metadata, and have been rehousing and finding new homes for the materials that were previously in boxes in the vault.

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Shannon inspecting videos from an incoming collection.

Is there anything about the videos you are working with that is surprising or unexpected?

I really enjoyed learning about the people living on the island of Lana’i, who were highlighted in part of the Juniroa collection which I QC’d. There was also a whole video I described that had a mama and a baby seal cuddling a beach!

Now that you have worked as a Moving Image Archivist and with Hawaiian cultural materials, what is your favorite aspect of the job and why?

I love inspecting film! It’s still my favorite part of being a Moving Image Archivist. There is something exciting about seeing beautiful images on film, and learning about/seeing interesting film damage.

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Shannon and Processing Archivist, Hoku, inspecting film.

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Receiving a massive collection.

So you’ve been here for a few weeks now, what are you enjoying most about Hawai‘i?

It’s beautiful! I love that I am both near the mountains and the ocean. This is the furthest I’ve ever been from home, and it has been so interesting to both learn about the Hawaiian culture and Hawaiian language, as well as just see the natural beauty that is Hawai’i. Also, everyone I’ve met has been so nice!

Do you have any advice for future Roselani Media Preservation Interns?

Maybe plan out things that you’d like to do in Hawai’i before you get here, as I’m still kind of figuring out what I want to do before I go. I would also recommend having an open mind, being prepared to work with multiple different kinds of materials. Also, be prepared for some weird film decay, if you end up working with film here!

As always, we want to give thanks to the generous support of the Henry Ku‘ualoha & Muriel Roselani Giugni Fund of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation, the Roselani Media Preservation Internship is offered each year at ‘Ulu‘ulu to give a student of merit who is committed to the preservation of our media history the opportunity to acquire practical experience in a moving image archive. 

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Spring 2019 Interns Zachary Carlos and Lauren Kato

In this Spring of 2019, we here at ‘Ulu‘ulu are graced with the presence of not only one, but two interns from the Academy for Creative Media Program.  With a few months under each of their belts, they have gotten into the swing of things and have become familiar faces in the archive. During their time at ‘Ulu‘ulu, some of their duties include digital migration of tapes from various collections, setting up the archive exhibits, and verifying collection inventory and item counts. While we can go on and on about the work our interns are doing, we wanted to hear directly from Zach and Lauren about themselves and their experiences.

Could you introduce yourself and tell us what it’s like being a student in the Academy for Creative Media Program?

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Zach in front of the digital video rack

Zach: Hi everyone, my name is Zachary Carlos, and I’m a senior at West Oahu’s Academy for Creative Media Program.

Being a student in the CM program is a great experience to be part of. With the classes offered in the program, I am able to further develop more towards my creative side with commercial designing and video gaming designing.

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Lauren at the entrance to the archive area

Lauren: Hi, my name is Lauren Kato, I am in my final semester of the Academy for Creative Media Program at UH Manoa. The Creative Media Program is a fun and enjoyable program for people interested in creative media.

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Zach scanning news log sheets from the KITV Collection

What brought you to your internship at ‘Ulu‘ulu?

Zach: I wanted to obtain some experience in an archival workplace and to understand the process of how things/materials are recorded and stored for safe keeping and future use. I would use some of the knowledge learned during my internship to be put on my resume, which would help companies I would like to apply for know that I have some knowledge in archiving important documents and such.

Lauren: As this is my last semester from the  Academy for Creative Media Program, I was thinking it would be a good idea to do an internship and my family agreed with me. My family and I were looking at different options, but my father was the one to suggest ‘Ulu‘ulu as a possible internship. With his help, we inquired with ‘Ulu‘ulu and in the end, it worked out and I was able to get an internship at ‘Ulu‘ulu.

Before you began interning at ‘Ulu‘ulu, what kind of image did the word ‘archive’ convey to you?

Zach: The image I envisioned for the word “archive” was like a vast building/collection of old materials: film, pictures, audio records, etc.  

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Lauren sitting at the digitizing station

Lauren: Like most people would think, the word archive makes me think of old books, old paper documents, and even old maps.

Has that image changed by starting this internship?

Zach: The image somewhat changed, but not entirely.

Lauren: Yes, it has, the word archive does have many interpretations depending on what it is being preserved for future generations.

Please tell us about a project that you’re currently working on.

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Zach digitizing footage from tapes

Zach: The project I’m currently working on is the KGMB Transcodes process. The process is basically re-coding ripped video files to a different source file by using a re-coding program. For the re-coding process, I have a batch of 10 videos to be re-coded, which takes about 20 minutes. After the 10 videos are done, I go to a spreadsheet to check how “damaged” the videos are by conducting quality control checks and damage ratings on the files.

Lauren: At ‘Ulu‘ulu, one of the projects I am helping out with is scanning old catalog index cards from the KITV News station. As for a Creative Media Project, I’m currently doing an interview assignment where I interviewed Janel Quirante about the ‘Ulu‘ulu archive.

Thank you to Lauren and Zach for sharing those thoughts with us. We sincerely appreciate your contribution to the archive and how much it helps the work that we do.  Be proud that you were a part of preserving Hawai‘i’s moving image history!

Paid 2019 Summer Roselani Media Preservation Internship

Applications are now being accepted for the 2019 Roselani Media Preservation Internship at ‘Ulu‘ulu Moving Image Archive!

The student selected as the 2019 Roselani Intern must be committed to the preservation of our media history and enrolled in a moving image or archival academic program. Working side-by-side with experienced archivists, the intern will gain practical experience in a moving image archive.

The intern will receive a $4,000 stipend.

Application Form and Instructions may be downloaded here.

Key dates:
March 1 – April 15: Applications accepted
April 30: Selection made
May – September: Internship takes place over 6-8 consecutive weeks (200 hours)

Interested in what a Roselani Media Preservation Internship is like? Meet some of our former interns:
2018 Roselani Intern
2017 Roselani Intern
2016 Roselani Intern
2015 Roselani Intern

Introducing our 2018 Roselani Intern

This summer we were very happy to welcome Miyuki Meyer as our awesome Roselani Media Preservation Intern! Miyuki is currently halfway through the MLIS program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she works as the Media Preservation Graduate Assistant at the Preservation Services of the University Library. She has a background in photography and video, and received her MFA in Visual Arts from SUNY at Purchase College. Miyuki grew up between Tokyo/Kagoshima, and Sharjah, U.A.E, and has been living in the U.S. for almost 10 years. We asked Miyuki a few questions to learn a bit more about her.

What brought you here to ‘Ulu‘ulu? What are some of the things you’re hoping to learn during your internship with us?
As Hawai‘i’s state regional moving image archive, ‘Ulu‘ulu’s growing audiovisual collection retains collective voices and memories of local communities’ past. I am most inspired by the archives’ mission to safeguard this history, and provide long-term preservation and access of the analog and digital collection through collaborative efforts. Amongst the many things I would like to learn, some of them include collection management, digital asset management, cataloguing native Hawaiian content, and maintaining and operating a video digitization lab.

What projects are you working on at ‘Ulu‘ulu?
I am working on two projects: processing Juniroa Productions materials, and digitizing raw footage of “Holo Mai Pele,” a traditional hula performance that tells the legendary tale of the two Hawaiian goddesses, Pele and Hi‘iaka. The raw footage was recorded on over 90 analog videotapes, and produced by Pacific Islanders in Communications. In my processing work, I’ve rehoused and reshelved a wide range of audiovisual formats in ‘Ulu‘ulu’s cold storage vault, and updated cataloguing records of the rehoused items using MAVIS. I have digitized almost 40 videotapes so far, and I’ve been learning about the overall video digitization and quality control workflow for best digital preservation practices. Outside of these projects, I also assist with environmental monitoring, and exhibit set up.

Is there anything about the videos you are working with that is surprising or unexpected?
As a new student of Hawaiian culture and history, I’ve enjoyed learning about hula ‘aiha‘a, which is a form of traditional hula dance that stems from the Pele clan, and pays tribute to the island and to Pele and Hiʻiaka (see Holo Mai Pele Educator’s Guide). It is humbling to see the performers rehearse and repeat countless segments of the same performance over and over again, and the powerful, beautiful poetic songs that accompany the dance movements that echo the forces of nature on the island has been an incredible experience. I was awed by the performers’ resilience, and the connection the dance has to their ʻāina. As I’ve navigated throughout O‘ahu on my days off, especially trekking the grounds of the hiking trails, my appreciation for Holo Mai Pele, as well as learning about the Hawaiian culture, has grown with each videotape. As an immigrant who has spent much of my life abroad, the connection people have to their home is personally significant. I was not expecting how much I would be drawn to the content of the videotapes, and how much this project would have a positive effect on me.

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Now that you have worked as a Moving Image Archivist and with Hawaiian cultural materials, what is your favorite aspect of the job and why?
With my interests in ideas of home and culture, I appreciate how working with Hawaiian cultural materials as a Moving Image Archivist means that I get to be part of the initiative to preserve local culture. My favorite aspect of the job is the real time capture process to video digitization, and researching the content of the production. This has allowed me to engage with the collection as a viewer to acquire an understanding of what is involved in the production tapes, as well as be an active participant. A lot of the videotapes I’ve worked on have been insightful, including the Ah Quon McElrath oral history tapes I’ve had a pleasure of watching.

So you’ve been here for a few weeks now, what are you enjoying most about Hawai‘i?
I’ve been spending on average 3-4 hours on TheBus everyday, which definitely sounds dreadful, but I’ve enjoyed exploring different neighborhoods on the island by foot. This has exposed me to how multicultural and diverse Hawai‘i is, and as someone who has been raised in a multicultural family, I felt at ease and at home. One of my favorite destinations is the Hawai‘i State Art Museum, where it exhibits a fantastic collection of artwork that reflects and forms observations on the history of the island. I got to see the Disney movie, Moana, in the native Hawaiian language on the outdoor fields of the Bishop Museum, and the Dead of Night, a powerful play by Edward Sakamoto at Kumu Kahua Theatre. Both were amazing experiences where I got to celebrate local culture with my coworkers at ‘Ulu‘ulu. The coffee at Morning Glass Coffee has been exceptional, where you are surrounded by a gorgeous mountain view of the Mānoa neighborhood. There is a short hike up north, where the trail leads up through the Lyon Arboretum and the Mānoa falls, where one is immersed in the lush greens of the mountain.

We hear that you are a foodie, what local delicacies have you discovered?
I took an hour bus ride to visit the Liliha Bakery to try their coco puff and poi donut, which was totally worth it. One morning Robbie, the Digital Media Specialist at ‘Ulu‘ulu, brought in a vintage pink box with blue lettering that read “Leonard’s Bakery,” which contained hot malasadas, a local Portuguese delicacy. Plain, haupia, chocolate filled malasadas. I am definitely going to miss these!

Do you have any advice for future Roselani Media Preservation Interns?
Beyond the duties of your internship, the overall experience depends upon what you make of it. My personal experience of working with Hawaiian cultural materials has been increasingly enriching as I’ve taken the time to explore the island, and learn about local culture and history. Visiting local museums, public libraries, historical sites, and trekking the grounds of the island are important parts of this internship. These explorations have heightened my awareness of working with cultural materials. In a way, it makes you realize how preserving native voices, its history and culture, are valuable initiatives to be part of.

Thanks to the generous support of the Henry Ku‘ualoha & Muriel Roselani Giugni Fund of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation, the Roselani Media Preservation Internship is offered each year at ‘Ulu‘ulu to give a student of merit who is committed to the preservation of our media history the opportunity to acquire practical experience in a moving image archive. 

Contact Zone and ‘Ulu’ulu Present Remember When Screening at Contact Zone located at the Surf Jack Hotel & Swim Club April 6-21

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Paid 2018 Summer Roselani Media Preservation Internship

Applications are now being accepted for the 2018 Roselani Media Preservation Internship at ‘Ulu‘ulu Moving Image Archive!

The student selected as the 2018 Roselani Intern must be committed to the preservation of our media history and enrolled in a moving image or archival academic program. Working side-by-side with experienced archivists, the intern will gain practical experience in a moving image archive.

The intern will receive a $3,000 stipend.

Application Form and Instructions may be downloaded here.

Key dates:
February 1 – April 1: Applications accepted
April 15: Selection made
May – September: Internship takes place over 6-8 consecutive weeks (200 hours)

Interested in what a Roselani Media Preservation Internship is like? Meet some of our former interns:
2017 Roselani Intern – https://hkgarchives.org/2017/09/06/introducing-our-2017-roselani-intern/
2016 Roselani Intern – https://hkgarchives.org/2016/08/15/introducing-our-2016-roselani-intern/
2015 Roselani Intern – https://hkgarchives.org/2015/09/08/roselani-intern/

‘Ulu’ulu 2017 Annual Newsletter

Aloha!

‘Ulu‘ulu is a Hawaiian word for “gathering or collection,” a fitting name for Hawai‘i’s film and video archive where our collective moving image memories are preserved for future generations.

Entering our 9th year, we now boast a collection of nearly 45,000 media items that have come to us from across the State and even parts of the Continent. This year we have been fortunate to welcome 10 new collection donors whose works will enhance our media literacy efforts. But what does that mean? How can these films and videos become part of media literacy? How will they provide a learning experience?

Moving images are a valuable visual documentation of community – of places, people, events – and ‘Ulu‘ulu strives everyday to preserve, catalogue, protect and share our rich film and video heritage of Hawai‘i while making it accessible to the public.  Thanks to a recent partnership with the Hawaiian Legacy Foundation (HLF), we anticipate teachers diving into ‘Ulu‘ulu and using these resources as part of media literacy integration across all subject areas. This is exciting as our 20th century history resides on the shelves at Hawai‘i’s official moving image archive.  We cannot thank our donors enough for their moving images which have become important examples of our historiography.

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We’d like to take a moment to share some of our accomplishments from 2017 with you. Click here to view the ʻUluʻulu 2017 Highlights report on our new collections, digital preservation projects, television and film premieres and more!

Mahalo nui loa for your support!