Category Archives: Announcements

Welcome Jon!

Please help us give a warm welcome to our first in-person intern in over two years, Jon Snyder! Jon has already been with us for about five weeks, but he has several more weeks to go and we would love to introduce him to you. He has agreed to do a brief interview with us to share a little bit about himself and his time with us so far. Welcome Jon! We’re happy to have you!


My name is Jon Snyder, I am pursuing my Bachelors Degree in English here at The University of Hawai’i West Oahu. I am the perfect example of that old saying “Jack of all trades, master of none,” as I have held many different jobs and hobbies. I enjoy attempting to create music and playing with sound editors. I also have a small book collection of about 400 books. At different points in my life I have been a courier for a local mortuary, a sign maker, and member of a punk band that opened for Blink-182 at the Blaisdell arena. Most recently I have been working at the Leeward Community College Library as a Reference Student Assistant.  

What brought you here to ‘Ulu‘ulu? What are some of the things you’re hoping to learn during your internship with us?

The idea of doing an internship with an archive was planted in my mind when I began classes at UHWO in 2016 by Dr. Brenda Machosky. Through our conversations after class she realized that with my personal experiences and academic work ethic, that I  would be a perfect match for something like this. When it came time to begin looking for an internship for the practicum, I wanted to find something that was not only interesting, but also on campus. ‘Ulu’ulu was the first and obvious choice. Aside from learning how an archive functions and what its purpose is, I would like to see how an archive, such as this one, can not only help to preserve the past but also service the future.  

What projects are you working on at ‘Ulu‘ulu?

I have been working with Hōkū and just finished creating the preliminary inventory for the films and tapes that have come in for the 100th Infantry Battalion. I have also been involved with preparing ʻUluʻulu video clips for website migration with Robbie. Both projects are interesting in their own ways. For me, it is interesting to see how a collection is handled at the beginning phase of its inclusion to the collections here. The interesting part of the website clip migration has been seeing the clips from the past. At times I have to stop myself from trying to see where the clip might be from and seeing how the location has changed over time. 

Is there anything about the items you are working with that is surprising or unexpected?

One aspect that surprised me was how much has to be done to a film or tape before a student or a researcher might even see it. It is not like archives are depicted in movies where someone just walks into the space and begins rummaging around. Everything has a name, number, and location. I really think working at Leewardʻs library has been an advantage for me in understanding how this aspect of an archive works.    

One unexpected thing actually happened the other day. While I was being shown how to examine film that has been donated, we noticed that this particular film had sound on it. I remarked that the sound resembled what a waveform looks like on a computer. To my surprise, I was told that that is pretty much exactly what it is. A lot of little things from my personal interests have seemed to find a use while I am here. I really enjoy learning by doing, and thankfully everyone here has trusted me with being hands on. 

Now, that  you’ve been at the archive for a few weeks have you found a favorite aspect?

I think the thing that I like the most is that there does not seem to be a ton of pressure in the process, even though I know that everyplace has their own deadlines to meet. The preservation process can be time consuming, but since the focus is on making sure that what is coming in is usable and can eventually be digitized, it is understood why some things may take longer than others. I really like the emphasis on preservation here. It is almost the same reason why I like libraries. If you think of every book in a library as being an idea, the library is sort of a repository for ideas. That same feeling is present here at ʻUluʻulu, except the medium being preserved involves moving images. In both examples, the people working at a library and at this archive are working toward a common goal of preserving the past in order to inform the future. 

Do you have any advice for future ‘Ulu’ulu Interns?

Since being a Humanities intern is not so typical for ʻUluʻulu, I would say that it is important to approach anything and everything with an open mind. I have found that even though my major is not typically associated with this kind of work, there is still a lot that I can relate from my schooling to this kind of archival work. If I had to use an analogy I would say, just try to be like a dry sponge and soak up all you can. You never know what may influence your direction in life. 

Thank you and farewell to Sidney!

Sidney hard at work even on her last day.

ʻUluʻulu is saying goodbye to our project assistant, Sidney Louie. After three years and graduating from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa with her masters degree in Library and Information Science she will be moving to the Honolulu Museum of Art as their archivist. We asked Sidney to do a quick interview with us before she headed out on her last day.


How did you learn about ‘Ulu‘ulu and why did you decide to work here?

When I left my longtime job in media, I thought about my next career steps. I listed the things that made me happy, and on top of that list were film and libraries.  I heard about ‘Ulu‘ulu Moving Image Archive among my peers in the media industry, but I did not fathom the scope and depth of the collections. My first visit to the archive was in Spring 2018, where I met up with Heather, Janel, Robbie, and Koa. Heather showed me the collection vault, which pretty much won me over. Janel told me that she was teaching a moving image archive course at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa (UHM) that fall semester. Soon afterwards, I enrolled in the Library and Information Science program at UHM, jumped on the archives track, and took Janel’s excellent class. A year later, the OHA project assistant job opened, and I bolted on the opportunity to work here. 

Could you share a little about the work you did at ‘Ulu’ulu?

I worked on a digitization project supported by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA) in partnership with OHA’s Papakilo Database. The digital content consists of television programs that focus on Hawaiian history, arts, and culture: “The Best of Treasures,” “Holo Mai Pele,” “Legacy of Light,” “Merrie Monarch Festival,” and “Pau Hana Years.” We accessioned, digitized, described, and made accessible 521 video tapes containing 224 hours of audiovisual recordings. I also worked on a few other side projects: helped Hōkū process incoming collections, wrote grants with Janel, and formatted transcripts for closed captioning. 

Was there anything about the videos you worked with that was surprising or unexpected?

I appreciate seeing the raw footage of two or more cameras on a particular scene. You can view quite a few of them in “Holo Mai Pele” from the Pacific Islanders in Communications collection. I enjoy seeing different angles and vantage points of the same scene. It helps me think about looking at an object with a different perspective.

You’ve recently graduated from the Library and Information Sciences program at UH Mānoa, where are you headed now and what will you be doing there?

I will be working as the archivist at the Honolulu Museum of Art, processing and preserving HoMAʻs institutional memory that includes not only the historic building on Beretania Street, but also the Spalding House (formerly The Contemporary Museum) and the Linekona Arts Center. I will also be involved with records management and reference and research services.

Now that you have worked as a Moving Image Archivist, what is your favorite archival media format and why?

Before, now, and forever is film. I was fascinated with 8mm and Super 8 film when I was young. I would watch the 8mm film reels in one of those small projectors in a carrel at the public library. I remember the 16mm films that we watched in elementary school. I also loved 35mm back when I worked at the Hawaiʻi International Film Festival when we hauled those heavy film cans. 

Tell us a little about what it was like for the last couple of years working for an AV archive through the pandemic?

I worked from home for about 14 months. Although I prefer working at the archive, I do like watching hours of video footage from home on my comfy reading chair or couch. I also tend do my best writing from home. However, I like to think about different ways of approaching a topic, and I enjoy listening to various points of view from my co-workers, especially when I hit an obstacle. I definitely will miss the camaraderie I have developed with my ʻUluʻulu colleagues. 

Do you have any recommendations for movies or TV shows that feature libraries, archives, or archival footage?

I was fascinated by Peter Jackson’s “They Shall Not Grow Old,” seeing how much his technical team worked on not only restoring the archival film footage, but also transforming it through adjustments of speed and light. It’s interesting to see an auteur’s handling of archival footage, which is vastly different from documentary filmmakers who use archival footage to present, argue, or support their own thesis or perspective. Most recently, I am enamored with Questlove’s “Summer of Soul” about the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival. The music and performances in the archival concert footage, shot by TV producer Hal Tulchin, are uplifting, toe-tapping, and delightful. It is a treasure trove of talent.


Thank you, Sidney, for your wonderful work and friendship. We wish you the best in your next chapter!

Paid 2022 Summer Roselani Media Preservation Internship (Remote)

Applications are now being accepted for the 2022 Roselani Media Preservation Remote Internship at ‘Ulu‘ulu Moving Image Archive!

The 2022 Roselani Internship at ‘Ulu‘ulu is a host site for the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA) Pathways Fellowship Program. AMIA Pathways Fellows may complete their internship at ‘Ulu‘ulu if accepted into both programs.

The student selected as the 2022 Roselani Intern must be committed to the preservation of our media history and enrolled in or a recent graduate of a moving image or archival academic program. Working remotely, but virtually side-by-side with experienced archivists, the intern will gain practical experience in a moving image archive.

The intern will receive a $6,000 stipend.

Application and information may be downloaded here.

Key dates:

February 1 – March 15: Applications accepted
April 15: Selection made
May – August: Remote internship takes place over 10 consecutive weeks (30 hours per week)

Interested in what a Roselani Media Preservation Internship is like? Meet some of our former interns:
2019 Roselani Intern
2018 Roselani Intern
2017 Roselani Intern
2016 Roselani Intern
2015 Roselani Intern

‘Ulu‘ulu 2020 Annual Newsletter

Aloha from all of us at ‘Ulu‘ulu!

As this challenging year comes to a close, I think we can all empathize with the readers of the Washington Post who were asked to describe 2020 in one word or phrase and they responded with “exhausting,” “lost,” “chaotic,” and “dumpster fire.” But in the midst of this exhausting and chaotic year, there were also many uplifting and positive moments that we experienced at ‘Ulu‘ulu which fit other descriptive phrases from the Post readers.

“Transformative.” Our UH West O‘ahu campus closed to the public on March 20, 2020 and ‘Ulu‘ulu, like all other departments across the UH System, very quickly transformed our in-person operations into a robust telework environment. We successfully pivoted to working from home, relying on remote communication with our researchers and students, as well as with each other. Zoom meetings, our online catalog and streaming server, and the Ask an Archivist reference portal became even more crucial tools and transformed the way we deliver our services. 

“Perseverance.” I applaud our ‘Ulu‘ulu team for its perseverance in 2020. Despite our limited on-site presence at the archive, we were able to provide preservation, cataloging, collection care, research assistance and access to the footage in our collections. We completed digitization projects supported by grants from the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Hawaiian Legacy Foundation, and Frank Moy and Marcia Mau. We continued our work with the Bishop Museum nitrate film collection, supported by the Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities. And we implemented our closed captioning program, transcribing and captioning over 600 video clips now streaming on our website.

“Six feet apart, yet closer than ever.” We were able to remain close with our researchers through our digital collections, which reached numerous audiences this year. We were thrilled to partner with the Polynesian Voyaging Society to screen four films and a live panel as part of the “Made in Hawai‘i: Visions of Hōkūleʻa” program during the HIFF 2020 online film festival. And we launched the web series “‘Ulu‘ulu Zoom Time” featuring interviews with some of the people who have contributed to our archival film and video collections. These conversations shed a light on the importance of archives, especially while we are apart.

We’d like to share more highlights from 2020 and wish you all the best for 2021!

Click here to view the ‘Ulu‘ulu 2020 Annual Newsletter report on our new collections, digital preservation projects, television and film premieres and more!

Mahalo nui loa for your support!

Don’t miss ʻUluʻulu at the Hawaiʻi International Film Festival!

With the current pandemic environment, many regularly scheduled festivals and gatherings have sadly been cancelled over the last several months. However, The Hawaiʻi International Film Festival (HIFF) was able to go virtual instead of cancelling. So, while we, film-buffs, are unable to gather together to celebrate, we are fortunate to be able to take part in the festival from the safety of our homes.

The switch to the new format meant that ʻUluʻulu’s participation in the HIFF would change a little from the last several years. Usually, we do an Archival Screening Night, featuring a selection from our vault that is restored and shared on the big screen for a curious public. While we weren’t able to do the usual Archival Screening Night, we were able to co-sponsor and collaborate with the Polynesian Voyaging Society (PVS) on the screening of four documentaries on the Hōkūleʻa for the “Made in Hawaii: Visions of Hōkūleʻa Program.” Three of the documentaries are older pieces, selected from the ʻUluʻulu vault, “Hōkūleʻa, Star of Gladness,” “Hōkūleʻa: Return to Tahiti,” and “Hōkūleʻa: The Proud Voyage Home,” and one is a new, collaborative piece between ʻUluʻulu and PVS titled, “He Waʻa, He Honua.” All will be available for free online streaming, along with Naʻalehu Anthony’s, 2018 film “Moananuiākea: One ocean. One people. One canoe.” from November 16th through the 29th!

The program also includes a discussion panel, that will take place this Friday, November 20th, at 7:00pm. The panel will include: Dr. Emmet Aluli, Pomai Bertelmann, Bruce Blankenfeld, Denise Espania, Larry Kimura, Kaiʻulani Murphy, Walter Ritte, Nainoa Thompson, and Governor John Waihee.

We are excited that sharing history and heritage through our collection and our work with others is still a possibility through the HIFF in this difficult time. Find out more about how to attend the panel or the films by following the links below!

To get free tickets to the panel, follow this link: https://fp.hiff.org/films/detail/hiff_talk_story_uluulu_panel_on_hklea_2020

For free tickets to watch any of the documentaries by following this link:
https://fp.hiff.org/films/section/made_in_hawaii_visions_of_hklea

A Special Message from the Archive

Aloha everyone,

As we all face the unique challenges that the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) has brought to us in recent months ‘Ulu’ulu is doing what we can to adjust so that we can to maintain service and ensure the well-being of our staff, researchers and colleagues. We are monitoring the situation as it swiftly evolves. Please be aware, that as a result, services and response times may be delayed.

To reduce the risk of exposure and transmission, ‘Ulu’ulu has also canceled any existing reservations and visits for the rest of the academic semester, and will not be making any new reservations for the time being.

Mahalo nui for your patience and understanding in this difficult time. Please stay safe, healthy and take care of each other!

Sincerely,

The ‘Ulu’ulu Staff